Wilkins Miller home page

"Wilkins Miller has been our accounting firm since the formation of Project Design Group, Inc. (PDG) in 2003. Wilkins Miller was recommended to us by another company. We were told that they were easy to work with and would provide the accounting advice that we would need as a start-up company. I can say without a doubt that we have not been disappointed. We not only use them for PDG's tax preparations, but we consult with them throughout the year for tax planning, business advice, payroll questions, and many other accounting related issues. If we have a question or need, someone is always available for us, and we are always provided with good, solid professional advice. Page Stalcup has even returned my phone call while on vacation which speaks volumes for Wilkins Miller's commitment to their customers. Part of the success of PDG is directly attributable to the relationship and advice received from Page Stalcup and Wilkins Miller over the past nine years. PDG doesn't consider Wilkins Miller the typical client/customer type relationship. We think of Wilkins Miller as a partner especially in the case of Page Stalcup, a friend."

Wes Gerhardt & Chuck Knight
Project Design Group, Inc.
 
Managing Your Tax Records After You Have Filed

Keeping good records after you file your taxes is a good idea, as they will help you with documentation and substantiation if the IRS selects your return for an audit. Here are five tips from the IRS about keeping good records.

1. Normally, tax records should be kept for three years.

2. Some documents such as records relating to a home purchase or sale, stock transactions, IRA and business or rental property should be kept longer.

3. In most cases, the IRS does not require you to keep records in any special manner. Generally speaking, however, you should keep any and all documents that may have an impact on your federal tax return.

4. Records you should keep include bills, credit card and other receipts, invoices, mileage logs, canceled, imaged or substitute checks, proofs of payment, and any other records to support deductions or credits you claim on your return.

5. For more information on what kinds of records to keep, see IRS Publication 552, Recordkeeping for Individuals, which is available by clicking here.